La Perouse

On the world map mid-15th century the land of our planet represents a single continent. There is no America at all. The north is on the left. At the top of the map is the road to heaven. Many brave navigators sacrificed their lives to better know the Earth. Such a navigator was Jean Francois de Gallo, Count de La Perouse.

The north is on the left. At the top of the map is the road to heaven. Many brave navigators sacrificed their lives to better know the Earth. Such a navigator was Jean Francois de Gallo, Count de La Perouse

La Perouse opened the island of Necker near the Philippines. On the way from Macau to Japan - the island of Even. The strait between Sakhalin and the mainland was accurately put on maps thanks to Laperuz and later named after him. But the most significant achievements of La Perouse - in the refinements that he made in his modern maps of the world.

Frigates "Astrolabe" and "Bussol", commanded by Count La Perouse, came out on August 1, 1785, on the orders of the French government from Brest. Expeditions were ordered to supplement and clarify the discoveries of the English captain Cook. And, in addition, to clarify the conditions of the whaling industry, to explore the possibilities of trade in fur and other goods with North America, China, Japan.

Laperuz also had secret orders: to seek new lands for the overseas colonies of France. The frigates were visited by botanists, astronomers, geometers, artists. During their stops near the distant shores, the expedition members climbed mountains, made sketches, specified coordinates. "Bussol" and "Astrolabe" round Cape Horn, visited Chile, at Easter Island, in the Hawaiian archipelago. At the end of June 1786, they reached Alaska, where Laperouse surveyed the vicinity of Mount Ilia. On the 13th of July here, in the bay, named Port of the French (now Lituya Bay), because of the strong current, a boat and two boats with 21 people were lost. From there, Bussol and Astrolabe traveled to the port of Monterey (California), where Laperouse described the Franciscan missions and made a critical note about the bad reception by the Indians. Then he again crossed the Pacific Ocean. After parking in Manila, La Perouse went to the shores of northeast Asia, where he reopened the island of Kelpaert. September 6, 1787 "Bussol" and "Astrolabe" anchored in Petropavlovsk, where Laperuz and his people met the most cordial reception from the garrison of the port under the command of ensign Khabarov. Going to sea on September 30, 1787, La Perouse went to Samoa, where he lost 12 people in a skirmish with the Samoans. The latest information about Laperuz refers to February 5, 1788. On this day, coming to the shores of Australia, he sent a report to the French naval minister. Nobody after that anywhere and never met neither "Bussoli", nor "Astrolabe". And in France they expected news from La Perouse. And, not having waited, have sent in search of new ships. But these searches have not yielded results.

News about the expedition of Count Laperuz came only after forty years. They were brought by another brave French navigator Dumont-Durville. Near the island of Vanikoro in Pacific Ocean he found the ship's guns at the bottom of the bay and a bronze bell with the inscription - "Bussol, 1785".

In 1964, a scientific expedition led by volcanologist Garun Taziev (Belgium) recorded the narratives of islanders transmitted from generation to generation about the death of the expedition of La Perouse. It followed that some of the teams were saved, and four sailors lived long enough and died in 1825. In May 2005, a sextant was found among the fragments of the fragments of Vanikoro, which was preserved near the shores of Vanikoro, on one of the slats of which one could read the engraved inscription "Mercier". According to the inventory of Bussoli, a sextant, taken from the Royal Naval Academy, manufactured by Mr. Mercier, was on board.

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