Emerald Kokovina

At Urals emeralds were discovered in 1830 on the bank of the river Tokovoy. Here, a significant amount of this valuable mineral raw material was extracted. The largest Emerald Kokovina was found in 1834. According to the description of the first auditor, it was clear, clean water crystal is grassy-green in color, with one polished face.

The largest Emerald Kokovina was found in 1834. According to the description of the first auditor, it was clear, clean water crystal is grassy-green in color, with one polished face

Emerald Kokovina (crystal height 18,5 cm, weight 2,226 kg).

Emerald Kokovina had an interesting fate. Yakov Kokovin, director of the Yekaterinburg lapidary factory, allegedly left it for his collection, hence his name - "Emerald Kokovina". For unknown reasons, he delayed the dispatch of the cut gem to St. Petersburg. They immediately informed him, and a commission came from Petersburg. Emerald was found in the apartment of Kokovina, which gave rise to accusations of him stealing and harboring state property. He was arrested and, realizing his guilt, committed suicide in prison.

After that the emerald Kokovina along with other valuable and unique stones was sent to St. Petersburg. There he was sent to the office of Count L.A. Perovsky, Vice-President of the Department of Units. In the end, a unique gem mysteriously "disappeared" from his office. The location of this incredibly amazing crystal is still unknown.

After Perovsky's death, the emerald was never found. His collection was bought by the landlord Kochubei, a descendant of Hetman Kochubei. Over time, the emerald Kokovina began to be called a unique Ural emerald with a mass of 11000 carats, purchased by Kochubey in the late 19th century (see fig.). But it was not that gorgeous gem that killed the talented Kokovin.

Later Kochubei's collection with this emerald Kokovina got to Vienna, where it was estimated at 150000 Russian rubles, and the emerald of Kokovina - in 50000 Austrian guilders. On behalf of the Soviet government, the collection was acquired in the 1920s by V.I. Kryzhanovsky.

There is an emerald Kokovina in the Diamond Fund of Russia.

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