Stones from the sky

In 1768 in France there was a terrible explosion. Something fell with a whistle, half crashing into the soft earth. Rushed peasants saw fallen stones from the sky. They wanted to raise one stone, but it was so hot that it was impossible to touch it.

In 1768 in France there was a terrible explosion. Something fell with a whistle, half crashing into the soft earth. Rushed peasants saw fallen stones from the sky

At that time, the fall to earth of a stone from the sky seemed so incredible that the Paris Academy of Sciences rejected its heavenly origin. But the "miracles" continued: the stones fell from the sky, eyewitnesses confirmed their fall.

Now we know that every year stones fall from the sky, sometimes singly, sometimes in rains, sometimes in the form of minute dust, sometimes in the form of heavy large blocks. Occasionally they even kill people and cause fires, break through the roofs of houses, drown in swamps. Such stones from the sky we call meteorites. For example, the question remains of an enormous meteorite that, on June 30, 1908, caused air and soil vibrations in all of Eastern Siberia and fell somewhere far in the marshy taiga. Podkamennoy Tunguska.

Stones from the sky in their composition and internal structure are very curious. Some very much resemble our ordinary rocks, although consist of some minerals that we do not know on Earth. Others consist of almost pure metallic iron, sometimes with droplets of a transparent yellow mineral - olivine.

Stones from the sky falling, usually, very strongly heated, sometimes to a temperature above 20000 C. This heating touches only the surface of the stone, inside it is very cold - so much that the fingers freeze, touching it. Usually meteorites split in flight due to uneven air pressure and sometimes turn into a stone rain, which scattered fragments for several kilometers.

All these fragments are carefully collected and stored in various museums. The best collections of meteorites are available in four museums: the Mineralogical Museum in Moscow, the Chicago Natural History Museum, London - the British Museum of Natural History and Vienna - the National Museum.

But where do they come from? Maybe it's the bombs the volcanoes of the Moon thrown out by it even when its molten surface was boiling? Or are they fragments of those small planets between Jupiter and Mars that revolve around our Sun? Or are they fragments of randomly comets? Only bold guesses can draw us their history in the depths of the universe.

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