The liquid boils... from sulfuric acid

Having conducted an interesting experience, you can see how the liquid boils... from sulfuric acid. In the beaker, drain the two cold liquids and put a test tube with water or alcohol into the glass. After a few minutes, the liquid in the test tube begins to boil. To conduct the experiment, in a thin-walled glass with a capacity of 0,5 L to 50 ml of cold water, add 200 ml of strong sulfuric acid and mix the test tube. Before this, half of the tube is filled with water or even better with alcohol, since its boiling point is less. This experience requires great care. It must be remembered that you can not pour water into sulfuric acid, but, on the contrary, pour sulfuric acid into the water. If a few drops of water get into the acid, it quickly overheats and evaporates with an explosion and splashes of hot sulfuric acid can get on the face or on clothes.

Having conducted an interesting experience, you can see how the liquid boils... from sulfuric acid

Sulfuric acid is known from antiquity, occurring naturally in a free form, for example, in the form of lakes near volcanoes. The smallest droplets of sulfuric acid can form in the middle and upper atmosphere as a result of the reaction of water vapor and volcanic ash containing large quantities of sulfur. The resulting suspension, due to the high albedo of sulfuric acid clouds, hampers the access of sunlight to the surface of the planet. Perhaps the first mention of acid gases obtained by calcining alum or iron vitriol of the "green stone" occurs in works attributed to the Arab alchemist Jabir ibn Khayan. In the 9th century the Persian al-chemist Ar-Razi, calcining a mixture of iron and copper sulfate (FeSO4*7H2O and CuSO4*5H2O), also received a solution of sulfuric acid. This method was perfected by the European alchemist Albert Magnus, who lived in the 13th century.

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