Biofilters

It's not a secret for anyone that the problem of preserving ecology has come to the forefront today. Complex sewage treatment facilities are being built, but they do not completely solve the problem. Probably, it is clear that all plants are natural biofilters. Tree leaves well precipitate dust. Their crown is quite high and wide, the total area of the foliage is extensive. But what happens to the dust next? This simply can not be explained. Here we must remember that the tree is alive!

Probably, it is clear that all plants are natural biofilters. Tree leaves well precipitate dust. Their crown is quite high and wide, the total area of the foliage is extensive

In the life of plants there are two currents: ascending and descending. The first (due to the suction force of the plant) comes vital substances from the soil. The second serves to metabolize substances, removing all excess from plants. The plant breathes, absorbs carbon dioxide, it can process many chemicals that have settled on it with dust. Those that are suitable for life, the plant will leave itself, others on a descending current will go through the roots deep into the soil. That's why the plants are biofilters, which nature itself created.

It seems everything is simple - plant a lot of greenery around the plant, and the air will immediately become clean! Yes, but what greenery? Over the years of research, scientists have determined that each tree and shrub has its own special abilities, and these natural biofilters are extremely legible, selective in their "filtration" activities. Chestnut, for example, and small-leaved lime are well captured and accumulate iron. White acacia and holly maple prefer copper. The same linden and maple can cope well with sulfur.

But what if a variety of substances are emitted into the atmosphere at the same time? Perhaps, to bring out a hybrid - a special breed of universal biofilter, capable of digesting everything? Unfortunately, this is unattainable. But still, biofilters can be designed. There is even a direction of science that studies biofilters, which was called industrial botany. For the botanist to pick up "details" means to find in a huge variety of trees, shrubs, grasses that by joint efforts would clean the air near a particular plant. This is the work of scientists. The most suitable biofilters are selected for each element of industrial pollution. Then you need to place a variety of greenery so that they act as a whole: find the optimal distance for planting, create a unique architecture of biofilters.

For example, biofilters for a ceramic plant can be placed as follows. The factory enclosures are encircled by a triple greens ring. The inner ring forms the most persistent and capacious biofilters for dust and harmful gases: white willow and acacia, common pear, silver maple. The second ring is more gentle plantations: birch, chestnut, ashberry. Lilac, plum, ash form the third ring of biofilters. It is rather of decorative significance. After every 40-50 m in the strip of plantings passages, driveways.

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