Flying mines

Flying mines were first proposed by the commander of the ship "Experience", Lieutenant-Captain M. Skalovsky on November 23, 1876. From his proposal, it was clear that from sea ships, balloons could be used to bomb the enemy.

Flying mines were first proposed by the commander of the steamer Experience of Lieutenant-Captain M. Skalovsky

Flying mines - balls with suspended explosives and incendiary substances should be let out by the wind on the enemy shore. At the same time, "...the ship should not have masts, so that the balls do not get tangled in the spar, ..the distance to the place where the balls fall can be calculated by burning a sponge soaked in a certain amount of alcohol".

Like flying mines, sometimes birds were used. The dove always returns to its dovecote. This is the principle of the work of feathery mail. The bird is caught, taken to the right place, and then released with a report on the foot. Actively used pigeons in the First World War, but in the 40s this experience was not forgotten. Sometimes pigeons could also be used as flying mines - instead of paper they were attached explosives to their paws.

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