Space paradox

Consider now another space paradox, which runs counter to the usual notions of earthly mechanics. Our usual ideas show that the faster we move, the sooner we will overcome the given distance. When moving spacecraft in gravity fields of heavenly bodies bodies this statement is not always true. For example, it refuses to serve under one cosmic paradox associated with flights from Earth to the planet Venus.

Consider now another space paradox, which runs counter to the usual notions of earthly mechanics

As you know, Earth orbits the Sun with a speed of about 29,8 km/s. Consequently, the same initial velocity relative to the Sun has also a spacecraft starting from the orbit, for example, of an artificial satellite of the Earth. The orbit of Venus is located closer to the daylight, and therefore, in order to achieve it, the initial speed of the apparatus relative to the Sun should not be increased, as, say, in flight to Mars, but reduced. But this is still only the first "half" of such a cosmic paradox. It turns out that the lower this speed, the faster the spacecraft will reach the orbit of the planet of Venus. As calculations show, at a flight speed equal to 27,3 km / s relative to the Sun, the flight will last 146 days, and at a speed of 23,8 km/s - only 70 days. Thus, our familiar earthly notions are not always applicable to the movement of space vehicles.

Tools